2016 Lifts

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Flint Ingredient Company

Flint Ingredient Company

Flint , MI

Flint Ingredient Company started four years ago with the purchase of 9.75 acres of vacant County Land Bank property. We started selling our produce at the Flint Farmers Market a year round market. Flint Ingredient Company began with a flock of 20 chickens, 6 sheep and vegetable production in a 48 ft hoophouse. We now focus primarily on vegetable production in four hoophouses and outdoor fields producing product year round on 1.5 acres. Franklin Pleasant and Erin Caudell are the primary operators with several part-time staff joining during peak season. In December of 2015, we opened a Michigan focused grocery store named The Local Grocer where we stock our produce. Later this summer will add a mobile vegetable market (with other community partners) to bring fresh local produce into the neighborhoods of Flint.

Corvus Landing Farm

Corvus Landing Farm

Neskowin, OR

Corvus Landing Farm is located at the Oregon coast. We grow high quality vegetables that we distribute locally through a 60 member CSA, farmers markets, and an on site farm stand. The farm started in 2010 with 1 acre of rented land and an intention to eventually increase in size to 4 acres. It has been steadily growing since. In 2014 we bought the property adjacent to our leased land, and this year we've added 1.5 acres of production, which will soon include berries and tree fruit.

We use all natural methods to preserve and protect the health of our land and our neighbors. We specialize in crops that do well in our cool coast climate and use hoop houses to increase our variety. In the spring, we grow and sell vegetable starts specialized for organic gardens in our unique coastal climate.

The Dancing Goat

The Dancing Goat

Tampa, FL

The Dancing Goat is one of the pioneer purveyors of raw goat milk in the state of Florida on a 3 acre example of progressive agriculture. In the trickle down of 9/11, Pam and Jim Lunn lost their jobs in the transportation industry and had to reinvent themselves. With a few goats for the children for their FFA fun, Pam decided that small urban farming was the future of agriculture and began to build the herd for 5 years until obtaining a license to sell the milk “for pet consumption only” in August of 2007. Pam, a 70's hippie, turned corporate yuppie, finally found her happy place as a dairy farmer. Until the children were grown, they were an integral part of the farm in milking, maintenance, herd health and showing goats in three states. Hope is held that at least one will want to come back and take over the farm after graduation from college in a few years. The milk line consists of 30-35 lactating goats at any one time from a herd of approximately 60 Lamanchas, French Alpines, Saanens and Recorded Grades. In addition there are several hundred chickens, quail, a few guineas, turkeys and chuckars. With a few emu eggs in the incubator, they plan to add emus to the chicken tractor area as a predator deterrent. This diversification has provided an array of products for local markets and retail outlets providing a safety net that when one product isn’t available, there is another to help maintain a steady income source. Goat milk soap under the name Dancing Goat Soaps has become popular in local stores and the farmer’s markets. This farm also serves as the Farm Branch of National Humane Society, raising a number of kittens each years with the help of neighborhood children and providing a home for cats that are not warm and fuzzy candidates for adoption. It also takes in numerous farm animals for National Humane as space and funds allow. The labor pool is one full time volunteer, the Farm Foreman, his intern assistant (a new position added in June), all complimented by homeschoolers and FFA youth that milk for the dairy as well as local community volunteers that want a taste of the farm without the financial or long term investment. The farm added a Cheese Chef in April of 2015 due to growing demands. Pam manages all aspects of the farm from the cheese production, milking and farm team, market sales, soap making and other farm duties, an 18/7 endeavor. Pam’s husband, Jim is disabled and while no longer able to physically take part in the farm activities, he drives for the supplies that are needed to keep the farm running and is the farm’s greatest cheerleader! The Dancing Goat runs a Goat Nanny program that spans the kidding season and recruits volunteers that learn to deliver goat babies, process newborns, bottle feed and care for the four legged kid’s needed. It requires a three month commitment and many in the Goat Nanny program come back year after year. As the Mission Statement outlines, The Dancing Goat is associated with the local high schools and colleges, providing educational opportunities in it’s commitment to “mentor the next generation in responsible agriculture”. In addition, Pam has served as Youth Dairy Goat Superintendent for over 15 years for the Florida State Fair. The dairy started turning a small profit in 2014, and looks forward to continuing increasing profits in the years to come. Relying on their savings and meager earning to maintain the farm for 7 years, Pam and Jim strongly believe that their farm is an important part of the community and this sacrifice was a necessary bridge to the future. As Pam states “we made every mistake possible”, the dairy has grown to a size where future earnings are realistic through continued implementation of a sustainable plan. The Dancing Goat has been featured on the front cover of Edible Tampa Bay in January 2015, numerous articles in the Tampa Bay Times and the Tampa Tribune. It was also voted as Favorite Farmer’s Market Vendor in the Creative Loafing Best of the Bay awards 2015, and the respect gained in the last few years has put The Dancing Goat into the front of the local food scene. Located in an agricultural-zoned, equestrian neighborhood, every inch of the property has been strategically planned for optimum utilization from duck pens in the drainage swale that floods 6 months a year to attached lounging paddocks that are connected to the barn stalls. The dairy had to invoke the Florida Right to Farm Act protection in 2015 to maintain it’s existence after a complaint from an unhappy neighbor. The Florida Right to Farm Act provides support for small farms that have been in existence without complaints for one year and protects them from nuisance lawsuits, providing an avenue to expand without resistance when best management practices are used.

Dogpatch Farm,LLC

Dogpatch Farm,LLC

WASHINGTON, ME

Mulefoot Hogs are critically rare so we are doing our best to rejuvenate interest in the breed. We started with our first three breeders in 2012 and have been able to double our sales and herd size each year due to the high demand for this Heritage breed. The pigs roam freely on 20-25 of our 74 acres where they get to root, run and play as pigs should. Humane treatment of all animals and responsible land stewardship are important factors to my family. I’m the main farmer and my husband and two children pitch in as needed. We occasionally have an apprentice to help out or hire help for specific projects. We currently have 165 pigs ranging from 4 pounds up to 700lbs. We also pasture raise a small number of chickens and turkeys each year.

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